Summer Safety

In the summer, children and teenagers get restless and spring fever sets in.

They begin counting the remaining days of school and the beginning of their summer vacation. What they do not realize is that the summer months can include dangerous situations if they are not prepared and alert.

Fatalities, accidents and injuries occur more frequently in the summer months than at any other time of the year. The warmer weather entices more people outside to engage in various activities, like swimming, boating, skating and biking. While all of these activities may seem harmless, in reality they can be fatal if precautions are not taken.

Be Prepared

Being safe means being prepared, whether outside or in your home. Before the summer activities begin, take a little time to go over some safety rules:

  • Biking and in-line skating are popular warm weather activities. Never go without a helmet or wrist guards. Spring into a safe summer by wearing safety equipment and knowing the rules of the road.
  • Never swim alone. Never dive into shallow water. Prepare for the unexpected by enrolling everyone in the family in a CPR and basic First-Aid course.
  • Boating and alcohol don’t mix. The rules of the road should apply to the water.  Never go boating alone and always wear a life jacket.  Make sure your safety kit on board includes a flashlight.
  • Being unprepared for an emergency can waste precious time. While you are spring cleaning, check smoke detector batteries. Update your first aid kit and keep it easily accessible. Remember that preparing for an emergency can save more than just time; it can save a life.
  • Ready for that summer vacation? A medical emergency can happen while you’re traveling, so visit your doctor before leaving. Be sure to bring any medications you may need. Bring a First Aid travel kit with basic supplies: Band-Aids, pain relievers, a thermometer, nausea medicine, etc. Make sure everyone knows where it is kept. When you arrive at your destination, find out where the nearest medical clinic or hospital is located. Being prepared can alleviate much of the stress associated with a minor illness or emergency.
  • Proms, graduations and holidays. Life’s celebrations often involve alcohol and can end in tragedy when mixed with driving. Drunk drivers kill more than 25,000 people each year. Enjoy special celebrations by designating a driver, wearing your seat belt and never letting a friend drive while intoxicated.
  • The dangers of cooking fires. Did you know that cooking fires account for about one in every five home fires?  Whether you’re stirring up a quick dinner or creating a gourmet four-course meal, be sure to keep an eye on your cooking. Stay in the kitchen, wear short or close-fitting sleeves, clean cooking surfaces, keep curtains, towels and pot holders clear of flames and hot surfaces, store solvents and cleaners always from heat sources and turn pan handles inward.